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The Win-Win Way to Play Office Politics
The Win-Win Way to Play Office Politics

These are the negative and stereotypical examples that help give office politics a bad name. Certainly, there are many unethical and unprofessional ways to be political, said Marilyn Puder-York, a psychologist and executive coach based in the New York area and author of “The Office Survival Guide.” When it is done ethically, though, no one loses, and you’ve “enhanced your reputation with the right people,” she said.

To Dr. Puder-York, office politics is a balance between cooperation and competition. There are times when it causes harm and dysfunction, and other times when it motivates and inspires employees, enhancing productivity and creativity, she said.

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The New York Times
Office politics: It's a Minefield Out There
Office politics: It's a Minefield Out There

By Richard Pachter, Knight Ridder

Book Review from the Boston Globe
The Office Survival Guide: Surefire Techniques for Dealing with Challenging People and Situations
Marilyn Puder-York
McGraw Hill

Books on office politics, I must confide, are invariably more entertaining than the authors probably intend, due to the necessity of including a multitude of anecdotes to illuminate the sundry lessons they offer. Author Marilyn Puder-York's tales of woe, replete with colorful characters and unfortunate (but commonplace) circumstances, provide the usual vicarious delights. But she fully explores each option in a wise and real-world way.

A typical case explores the unhappiness of an executive passed over for promotion, despite being amply qualified, according to her self-assessment, which Puder-York does not dispute. She then probes a bit at the executive's other assumptions, revealing her lack of proactive communication with the boss who'd promoted another in her stead. Additionally, the author points out her too-casual workplace wardrobe, which failed to support the image of the role she'd sought.

The larger message is to pay close attention to details that may seem less relevant to the job at hand but are clearly useful in getting the idea across to the boss that one is worthy of advancement.

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How to Cope With a Boss Who Meddles Too Much
How to Cope With a Boss Who Meddles Too Much

"You're not going to change a micromanager's habits overnight," said Marilyn Puder-York, an independent executive coach in New York and the author of "The Office Survival Guide: Surefire Techniques for Dealing With Challenging People and Situations." "Remember that reversing this kind of behavior takes time."

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The New York Times

Preparing for Leaner Times
Preparing for Leaner Times

''Getting your self-esteem from money, power, and control is diminishing,'' says Marilyn Puder-York, a psychologist who counsels scores of executives and professionals in New York.

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Fortune 

Managing; Rankings by the Rank and File
Managing; Rankings by the Rank and File

"Two-way appraisal fosters the partnership relationship that many companies now want with employees," said Tod White, chairman of Blessing/White Inc., human resource consultants in Princeton. Conversely, it can provide a safety valve for employees stuck with bad bosses who do not want to change, said Dr. Marilyn Puder-York, a clinical psychologist who practices on Wall Street. "Many of the executives who survived the 1980's are jungle fighters, not leaders," she said. "Upward appraisal lets their employees vent frustrations in a safe forum."

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The New York Times